Publications

Nutrition-Related Non-Communicable Disease (N-RNCD) Profile-Cambodia

Download this publicationEvidence increasingly supports the hypothesis that maternal undernutrition, as well as in-utero and infant and young child undernutrition, increase the risk of developing nutrition-related non-communicable disease later in life.

The JSI-led SPRING project has recently published a series of descriptive analyses in selected countries to explore where future risks may lie and to identify how undernutrition programs may need to be tailored to reduce health problems as children and adolescents reach adulthood. This two-page brief begins to explore where future risks may lie in Cambodia, identifying where undernutrition programs may need to be tailored or targeted to better avoid later life health conditions. It appears stunting is still the largest concern, though there are significant differentials by sub-group. More in-depth analysis is needed to understand the determinants and dynamics influencing these relationships. SPRING is currently working to develop more evidence on why certain sub-populations are more at risk and how this information can be used to adjust nutrition programs. JSI/SPRING

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