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Integrated Delivery of Health Services During Outreach Visits: A Literature Review of Program Experience Through a Routine Immunization Lens

Integrated Delivery of Health Services During Outreach Visits: A Literature Review of Program Experience Through a Routine Immunization LensThis article details the findings of a comprehensive study conducted by JSI and the Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) exploring the benefits and risks of integrated services at immunization outreaches. The study draws from 33 published articles and gray literature, found on organization databases and websites, which focus on various international immunization and outreach initiatives spanning from 1992 to 2009.

Outreach is defined, for the purpose of this article, as health services provided 5-15 kilometers from a static clinic to underserved, hard-to-access populations. Successful outreach efforts in routine immunization have led to interest in integrating those services with other critical interventions like vitamin A supplementation and the distribution of deworming tablets and mosquito nets. Successful integration of these services would be a cost and time efficient way to provide at-risk families with a broader range of life-saving interventions, however there are concerns that additional service provision may over-burden existing immunization efforts. The article outlines the obstacles to successful integrated outreach services and recommends careful planning to increase new interventions without jeopardizing established initiatives. Tasnim Partapuri, Robert Steinglass, and Jenny Sequeira.

Read the article in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 205 (suppl. 1)